A Guide for a Data Recovery Plan

Anyone who’s part of their organization’s IT team should be well aware by now that unexpected accidents, emergencies, and disasters can hit a company when its least expecting it. Unfortunately, such events can lead to the loss of valuable data. Data is often considered the most important asset of focus in a greater disaster recovery plan, and its recovery is often critical for business operations. Data recovery is when data that was somehow lost, corrupted, or otherwise inaccessible is restored to its previous location within a network, whether that be a computer, mobile device, storage device, or server.

WHY IS DATA RECOVERY NECESSARY?

Generally speaking, while data is incredibly valuable in the eyes of organizations, it is also increasingly difficult to manage and can be highly sensitive. When sensitive data is lost or falls into the wrong hands, it can have negative (and expensive) implications for the organization and the person or people whose data was compromised. For example, if a financial organization like a bank were to lose access to their customers’ sensitive financial information, not only could the bank be hit with large compliance fines, but the bank’s customers could then be at risk of having their financial info fall into the wrong hands. Recovering access to data that has been stolen, lost, or otherwise compromised is essential in minimizing that damage as much as possible.

KEY ESSENTIAL STEPS IN YOUR DISASTER RECOVERY PLAN

CREATE A LAYERED SECURITY PLAN TO PREVENT A DISASTER

Data recovery and a disaster recovery plan, in general, are meant to be reserved for unforeseen emergencies. Ideally, data loss of any kind should be a rare occurrence. Creating a layered data security plan can stop preventable data loss before it happens. In the event it does, to limit the damage, organizations should prioritize having a detailed disaster recovery plan in place.

IDENTIFY THE BIGGEST THREATS TO YOUR DATA

The cyber threat landscape is constantly growing and evolving, meaning organizations need to stay up to date on the latest threats. Threat research, intelligence, and mitigation solutions can help to prevent unwanted data leaks, reduce noise and false positives, and help organizations mitigate data loss if they do occur.

On the other end of the threat spectrum, though, organizations should also prepare for other types of unintentional disasters like power outages, natural disasters, building fires, and more that aren’t necessarily preventable. Regardless of whether data loss is caused by a bad actor with malicious intentions, like a targeted attack, or an event outside of anybody’s control, like a natural disaster, organizations need to concentrate on identifying the biggest threats to their data and quantifying the risk of each threat.

Check all the other essential steps here

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If this information is helpful to you read our blog for more interesting and useful content, tips, and guidelines on similar topics. Contact the team of COMPUTER 2000 Bulgaria now if you have a specific question. Our specialists will be assisting you with your query. 

Content curated by the team of COMPUTER 2000 on the basis of marketing materials provided by our partners/vendors.

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